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20130324
20130324
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
married. >> even president obama supports marriage for the nation's gays and lesbians and his administration has filed a brief an their behalf with the supreme court. >> if we are successful and we prevail and no lower court rulings are reversed and proposition 8 goes away. that will be our goal. we will have reached our objective. it will also send a message to the rest of the country. >> but it will not change the minds of critics like bill may, who campaigned on behalf of prop 8. >> it's not about same-sex marriage, it's about the question of whether marriage should be redefined to eliminate the only institution that has kids with moms and dads. >> we aren't trying to redefine marriage, we are trying to have access to marriage. that's what it is about. equal access to an institution that clearly the american society holds dear. >> they said they feel a sense of honor and responsibility for their role in this historic case. it's unclear if the justices will rule narrowly just on california or make a 50-state decision. both sides are optimistic. >> we are very confident that
-sex couples should be able to get married. >> even president obama supports marriage for the nation's gays and lesbians and his administration has filed a brief an their behalf with the supreme court. >> if we are successful and we prevail and no lower court rulings are reversed and proposition 8 goes away. that will be our goal. we will have reached our objective. it will also send a message to the rest of the country. >> but it will not change the minds of critics like bill may, who campaigned on behalf of prop 8. >> it's not about same-sex marriage, it's about the question of whether marriage should be redefined to eliminate the only institution that has kids with moms and dads. >> we aren't trying to redefine marriage we are trying to have access to marriage. that's what it is about. equal access to an institution the american people hold deer. >> they said they feel a sense of honor and responsibility for their role in this historic case. it's unclear if the justices will rule narrowly just on california or make a 50-state decision. both sides are optimistic. >> we are very confident
think same-sex couples should be able to get married. >> even president obama supports marriage for the nation's gays and lesbians and his administration has filed a brief an their behalf with the supreme court. >> if we are successful and we prevail and no lower court rulings are reversed and proposition 8 goes away. that will be our goal. we will have reached our objective. it will also send a message to the rest of the country. >> but it will not change the minds of critics like bill may, who campaigned on behalf of prop 8. >> it's not about same-sex marriage, it's about the question of whether marriage should be redefined to eliminate the only institution that has kids with moms and dads. >> we aren't trying to redefine marriage, we are trying to have access to marriage. that's what it is about. equal access to an institution that clearly the american society holds dear. >> the berkeley couple, parents of four sons, say they feel a sense of honor and responsibility for their role in this historic case. it's unclear if the justices will rule narrowly just on california or mak
marriage to opposite-sex couples only. on the same night californians voted barack obama in office, they ovgot this vote back. >> they created the judiciary and legislature and they control the constitution. they decided that marriage should be between a man and woman. >> scott: supporters of gay marriage asked the california supreme court to strike down the newly enacted proposition 8, but in 2009, the state court upheld it. that was the end in state court, but marked an avenue in federal court. in 2010, federal judge walker struck it down saying it violated the equal protection under the law. in a split decision, a three-judge panel of the circuit court of appeals upheld that ruling last february. setting the stage before the u.s. supreme court. this past valentine's day, gay couples demanded marriage licenses at san francisco city hall as they have every year since 2004. they were turned away. >> it affects us in so many ways in our every day life. what we want is to be treated fairly. >> scott: i spoke with lieutenant governor gavin newsom recently about what compelled him to t
against former obama adviser jim messina on guns, gay marriage, and developments in the budget you just heard. >>> just hours from now, the giant power ball drawing. perhaps later this evening, an american family with no budget problems at all. tonight, hear a man who's already won the lottery seven times, as we ask him is the quick pick really the worst option? here's abc's rob nelson. >> reporter: most of us have battled our inner procrastinator at one time or another. tonight, time is running out. and $320 million is on the line. >> i need a lot of reminders. then i feel like the pressure of the deadline. i need to get the ticket. >> reporter: lottery officials say 60% of the power ball tickets are bought on the last day. >> $2 and a dream. >> reporter: but seven-time lottery winner, richard lustig, who wrote a book on how to win the lottery, says waiting until the last minute to buy your ticket won't give you an edge. >> thinking that waiting to the last minute to buy your tickets will increase the chances of winning is absolute foolishness. >> reporter: he doesn't believe in quick
at the time was a big deal and still 19 states where interracial marriage was illegal when barack obama's parents got married in 1960 in hawaii. so the country changed, and that law is not only unconstitutional now, but it is unthinkable, and the question is, is same sex marriage moving in the same d k direction? at the moment, it does, but it is certainly not there yet. >> jeffrey, i know you don't like to make predeck shun predi these things, but do you have any idea? >> i think that the most likely result is that the court will overturn the defense of marriage act, will say that law is so discriminatory that it is unconstitutional and the proposition 8 case is a much tougher call, because there are a lot of moving parts and they could rule just for california, rule for the whole country, or dodge the issue on procedural grounds and so that one, i won't venture a guess on. >> okay. thank you, jeffrey toobin. >>> a well respected conservative marriage to endorse gay marriage, and are we seeing a shift in the republicans? we will ask that question next. get great values on your favorit
historic cases this weani s. president obama supporting same-sex marriage issued a brief with the court calling doma constitutional. >> it's not their rule to decide what's constitutional. doma was a law passed by the house and senate and signed into law by president clinton. and in our system of government, the administration doesn't get to decide what's constitutional. the supreme court does. >> and it will. starting tuesday. a constitutional law expert, nyu, and the president of founder of freedom and the right leaning heritage foundation. thank you to all of you for being here. folks who haven't followed this case as closely, how did we get here and why of these two cases being heard so close together? >> beginning with the second question, serendipity they're being heard together. winded they're way up through separate passes of the country to converge at the supreme court. the first case, perry case heard tuesday is a prop 8 case a state restriction on same-sex marriage. whereas the case herd wednesday, the defense of marriage act, whether or not federal benefits vts to be afforde
on the right? when does the political calculus change for republicans on gay marriage? >> i don't think it's going to change. if you look at the exit polls that i alluded to earlier, three-quarters of obama voters said they were for same-sex marriage. three-quarters of romney voters said they were not. so there are people in the democratic party who, you know, support traditional marriage. i thought it was really interesting, by the way, this week. i thought it was politico went to a lot of the red state democratic senators on the ballot in 2014. people like mark pryor of arkansas and others, mary landrieu in louisiana. they haven't changed their position, and i still think the republican party is going to remain a pro-family, pro-marriage, pro-life party. i don't think that will change. and if it does, by the way, i think the big tent will become a pup tent. if you look at the data, 44% of all the votes mitt romney got last november were from self-identified evangelicals. >> but ironically, again, romney's data analyst suggests that the republicans and independents who voted for the presi
challenges against proposition 8 and the defense of marriage act. >>> president obama is back home in the u.s. he was in israel, the west bank, and jordan. >>> secretary of state john kerry remains in the middle east including meeting with benjamin netanyahu. he urged iraqi leaders to overcome sectarian that threatens the stability. let's go to kristen welker. what is the president saying about the trip to the middle east? how are they characterizing this trip? >> reporter: hi, alex. officials believe he set out to do. he also reaffirmed the united states' commitment to the israeli people. the israeli people were skeptical about that prior to the trip. and then there was an unexpected diplomatic victory where president obama, through arm twisting, convinced netanyahu to call turkey and apologize for a deadly raid against a turkish ship. that will be key in moving forward with issues like syria and tries to reopen the peace process in the middle east. so i think white house officials are feeling good about the trip. the big question, if you talk to experts in the region, is what is president
the first african-american president of the united states, born of an interracial marriage, on that night california voters chose president barack obama and passed proposition 8. stripping same sex california couples of their freedom to marry. which is what made this moment so extraordinary. president obama who just a few months before had articulated his own support for marriage equality stood on the steps of the capitol immediately after taking the oath of office for the second time and articulated that lbgt rights are part of the freedom and fairness in america. >> we the people, declare today that the most evident of truths that all of us are created equal. is the star that guides us still, just as it guided our forebearers through selma and stone wall. >>> so here in nerdland with us to mark this moment in the struggle is california congresswoman and senior democratic whip, barbara lee. alongside the great kenji yoshi yoshino, professor at new york's university law school. lisa dug began, professor of cultural and social analysis. darlene nipper, executive director of the national ga
is that not the case? >> well, we understand historically that keeping the races apart is wrong. what marriage is about is bringing together the two opposite halves of humanity for a deep social good. that's why as president obama himself said, there are people of good will on both sides of this issue. what we need the supreme court to do is not try to short circuit this debate. we need to keep the debate alive. americans on both sides of this issue are deeply invested in this debate. we don't need a 50-state solution presented by the supreme court. when our democratic institutions are capable of handling the issue. that's what the court will decide. whether it's going to impose a redefinition of marriage among all americans or whether we're going to be allowed to continue to work on this together state by state. >> so not a roe v. wade decision is what's being argumented, don't make a decision that then sets the stage arguing four years to come. >> look, candy, this case -- the case before the united states supreme court both in terms of proposition 8 is really about fundamental right. >> and the defe
barack obama's parents got married in 1960 in hawaii. so the country changed. and that law is not only unconstitutional now, it's unthinkable. and the question is, is same-sex marriage moving in the same direction? at the moment, it does. but it's certainly not there yet. >> jeffrey, i know you don't like to make predictions about these things, but what do you think is going to happen? do you have any idea? >> well, i think the most likely result is that the court will overturn the defense of marriage act, will say that that law is so discriminatory, it's unconstitutional. the proposition 8 case is a much tougher call. there are a lot more moving parts. they could rule just in california, they could rule for the whole country. they could dodge the issue on procedural grounds. so that one, i'm not even going to venture a guess on. >> all right. again, thank you, jeffrey toobin. >> okay. >>> a well-respected conservative senator, the latest republican to endorse gay marriage. are we seeing the beginning of a shift among republicans? we're asking the former chairman of the log cabin repub
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)